MIAS education: MIAS voyagers

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I started voyaging with MIAS Education courses in Autumn 2021, after many years of pause from studying Ibn Arabi. The online courses have brought a wonderful opportunity to plunge into these beautiful texts again, in a more enriching way than I had ever experienced. The hermeneutical invitation coupled with the supportive group discussions have given me the confidence to trust my own intuition when reading Ibn Arabi. This encouragement has led me to start my PhD in a department of Heritage Studies, where I am researching how Ibn Arabi´s legacy can contribute to a re-imagination of cultural heritage. I have also returned to studying Arabic language, but now I look at letters and words in a different way: I don´t anymore just look for what specialists have written about them, but I have learnt to allow myself to be guided by my imagination. In this process I have also started to write poetry which I have been sharing in the different voyages.
I live in Portugal in a mountain, far from big cities and big Universities, but with the support from MIAS Education Team I feel connected to others that share the same passion. The WhatsApp group also provides a great ground for discussions, random questions and spontaneous insights. We might be deep upon the etymology of a word, a book recommendation, a dream, or finding surprising connections between texts. I hope to participate in the future journeys and continuously strengthen this connection over the years. I am immensely grateful for the gifts bestowed upon the voyagers, and I hope that in the future I can give something in return, perhaps by sharing the results of my research, supporting the future Blog, or in whatever way the Ocean may flow.” — Ana Ludovico

I’m so grateful for being in this group and to have the opportunity to learn more about Ibn ‘Arabi and to listen to many life experiences…. you have no idea of how much I enjoy the courses, the prayers, the people and their insights. I’m so grateful for finding this group and I’m so excited to start the next journey.” — Celia Salazar

Many thanks to the MIAS team for steering us on the ‘In each thing…’ journey. I loved the analogy of voyaging on the ocean. It gave the course an added dimension which took us from the technicality of Zoom into the imaginal realm – much more fitting for the subject of our study. It was an exciting, challenging and rich journey and I learned a lot from the process. I was delighted to have the opportunity to engage with texts that I’ve never read or studied before and it is always wonderful to meet and engage in shared enquiry with other Arabi enthusiasts. Wishing you well for your ongoing voyage.” — Patricia Taddei

Getting to know my ‘self’ is quite a big question right? I’ve been doing a bit of writing on it and I would say yes, to some extent, the course is providing this and is perhaps a gateway to going deeper. The group was amazing and I feel blessed and privileged to have been a part of it.” — Aishah Safdar

I think the MIAS team did a great job: in the right balance between guidance/facilitation and letting it happen, so to speak. I liked having a separate WhatsApp group that allowed for more informal give and take. I liked the participants a lot, some of whom seemed to know each other from other courses, and also already clearly had strong backgrounds in Sufi work. I am looking forward to more journeys together.” — Professor Nukhet Kardam

Meet the Education team

Rim Feriani

Rim Feriani is Educational Director at The Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi Society, UK. She had previously lectured in Arabic language at King’s College, London and taught Arabic language and cultural studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Westminster, London.

The title of Rim’s doctoral thesis is Symbols and Worlds: A Study of the Sacred in a Selection of Works by Assia Djebar, Tahar Ben Jelloun and Salman Rushdie. In her thesis, she demonstrates how the works of three internationally-acclaimed writers of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the Algerian Assia Djebar, the Moroccan Tahar Ben Jelloun and the British-Indian Salman Rushdie creatively engage with the Islamic heritage. Combining Ibn Arabi’s Sufi thought with Paul Ricoeur’s hermeneutic approach, it explores the symbolic and ontological underpinnings of the Sacred, providing a broader understanding of their literary works. In 2018, Rim presented some of her research key findings at the Annual General Meeting held by Ibn Arabi Society (MIAS). In February 2020 and in collaboration with The Beshara Trust [/], Rim delivered a seminar on the concept of the journey in the works of Ibn Arabi. In August 2020, Rim gave a talk entitled “Alif: the One and the Many”, which can be accessed online here [/]. Rim has also published on her research in The Maghreb Review’s journal and has recently published a book chapter (2020, co-authored with Professor Debra Kelly) entitled “Reading Signs and Symbols: From the Body to the Text”, which appeared in Postcolonialism and Transnationalism (Ed. Jane Hiddleston and Khalid Lyamlahy).

Richard Twinch

Richard Twinch, trained at Cambridge University and the Architectural Association. He studied Ibn ‘Arabi at the Beshara Schools in the 1970s and 80s.  He was a senior lecturer at the Prince of Wales’ Institute of Architecture and a tutor at Oxford Brooke’s University. He was External Examiner and then tutor to the Visual Islamic & Traditional Arts Department at the Royal College of Art (now The Prince’s Foundation School of Traditional Arts [/]). He practised architecture in Oxford for many years. He is currently a Trustee for the Muhyiddin Ibn ‘Arabi Society, Oxford.

Lucy Barratt

Lucy Barratt’s interests include the imagination, extending from Aristotle, through Kant to thinkers such as Henry Corbin.  Studies in 20th Century Continental Philosophy led to an M. A. concluding with a treatise on Heidegger and aesthetics. An interest in literary theory, especially the hermeneutic tradition stretching from Schleiemacher to exponents such as Paul Ricoeur, has informed her study of Ibn ‘Arabi.  She is currently a trustee of the Muhyiddin Ibn ‘Arabi Society.

Ceciliy Twinch

Cecilia Twinch is a Senior Research Fellow of the Muhyiddin Ibn ‘Arabi Society, Oxford. She studied Modern and Medieval Languages at Cambridge University. Besides working as a teacher, translator and editor, she has lectured on Ibn ‘Arabi and mysticism worldwide since 1990. She has had numerous articles and chapters in books published, many in Spanish, and her publications include an English translation from the Arabic, with Pablo Beneito, of Ibn ‘Arabi’s Contemplation of the Holy Mysteries and a translation of Know yourself: An explanation of the oneness of being (Ibn ‘Arabi/Balyani).

Kris Ramlan

Kris Ramlan is a currently reading Malay poems by Hamzah Fansuri (fl. 16th century) in the Akbarian tradition for her PhD project at the Goethe University of Frankfurt, Germany. Among others, she is exploring Hamzah’s paradigm of voyaging, and this exploration is enriched by Sufi studies, Malay philology, hermeneutics, and transculturality approach. She lectures at the university and previously was the Head of Corporate Sustainability Reporting at a Fortune 500 company.

Kris Ramlan

Bharatwaj Iyer is a PhD student in the Humanities and Social Sciences Department at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, where his doctoral work is on Heidegger’s philosophy of history and the place of the Islamic philosophical tradition.

Wafa Al-Turk

Wafa Al-Turk comes to MIAS with a deep passion (Ishk) for Islamic mysticism, religious studies and spirituality. She has studied with Dr. Omid Safi through Illuminated Courses, The Heart of The Quran and The Heart of Rumi’s Poetry.  With MIAS she has journeyed in the oceans of Ibn Arabi, with Dr. Rim Feriani and many great voyagers, through the courses “Embark therein: from Noah’s Ark to Adam’s Fall”, “With which eye do I see Him”, “In each thing He has a sign” and “I fled from myself to Him”. Wafa Al- Turk carries a BS in Architectural Studies from the University of Nebraska Lincoln. She is a certified yoga teacher with Yoga Alliance, and has been teaching in her community for over 10 years. With years of personal practice, Wafa believes yoga offers a pathway to self-study at a spiritual level that has transformed her life from the inside out.

Mark Temple
Mark Temple received an education at the Beshara School of Intensive Esoteric Education in the UK under the auspices of The Beshara Trust. This is ongoing. He helped in the establishment of two such schools in Australia, both now operating peripatetically and online. He is assisting with activities of MIASAP and the Ibn ‘Arabi Research Initiative, both centred in Melbourne, Australia. He is passionate about letters, words, sentences and their meanings in the light of the teachings of Muhyiddin Ibn ‘Arabi and his students.
Mark Temple

Yafiah Katherine Randall completed her doctorate on Sufism in Israel as practiced by Jews and Muslims and her work is published by Routledge under the title Sufism and Jewish-Muslim Relations: The Derekh Avraham Order in Israel. Her interviewees in Israel all spoke of the importance of the concepts of Ibn ‘Arabi to their understanding of the other as a mirror of the Divine and it became clear to her that the most significant component of conflict transformation is in knowing the other. Her research has also been translated into Hebrew. She has been involved in interfaith initiatives such as Radio Salaam Shalom in Bristol and the Israel-Palestine group at the Centre of Religions for Reconciliation and Peace at the University of Winchester. She has written a case study comparing the work of Radio Salaam Shalom and peace-makers in Israel in a book chapter, “Loving the ‘Enemy’: An Alternative Narrative on Jewish-Muslim Relations” in Paul Hedges (ed.), Controversies in Contemporary Religions, Volume 3: Issues in Traditions and Case Studies, (Praeger Multi-Volume Series, September 2014) and has published a paper “Entering Jerusalem: Deconstructing Assumptions on Identity as a Researcher and as a Sufi” for DISKUS, the academic journal of the British Association for the Study of Religions. For the past two years she has been co-hosting Beshara courses on Zoom. Yafiah is particularly interested in the role of hermeneutics in the creative imagination and the isthmus known as the barzakh in the work of Ibn ‘Arabi. At present she is co-authoring a book inspired by this topic. She is currently a trustee of the Muhyiddin Ibn ‘Arabi Society.